Total Pageviews

Jun 3, 2017

Swim Diapers for Bigger Kids and Adults

So this is another post where I'm grateful for those other parents in my facebook support groups who know the answers I'm looking for.
My kids outgrew swim diapers forever ago.  The problem is, they LOVE swimming.  I was trying to time their BMs, so that we wouldn't be swimming when that happened and just cross my fingers and hope for the best, but finally I found a solution, thanks to the other parents in my support group.
I personally liked the disposable swim diapers the best.  I already have enough laundry.  So, if you are looking for swim diapers for bigger kids or adults, Swimmates Disposable Adult Swim Diapers are a great option.  You can find them on North Shore's website and on

Other parents suggested washable swim pants, which would be cheaper in the long run.  A lot of autism parents use these.
I'm just excited that there are options out there for the bigger kids.  :)

A Couple Tips for the Parents of Poop Smearers from Other Parents of Poop Smearers

As an autism mom, who happens to clean smeared poo at least once a day, I'm grateful for the support groups on facebook that give handy tips.
For example:  One woman suggested that if you have lingering poo smell on your hands after cleaning all that loveliness, use a dab of toothpaste to wash your hands.  It will get the poo out.  It works too.  I tried it.  Thank you, thank you, thank you for that tip.
Another hygiene product that works good for poop smeared in the hair is shaving cream.  Who knew?

Many parents suggest putting your kids in onesies or footie pajamas but having the zipper on the back.  I did try that, but my kids basically tore the pajamas apart to get out of them.  So that was a fail for me.  Another parent, when I posted that my kids won't stay in the onesies or footie pajamas suggested these:

Unfortunately, my kids are too big for those, but I wish I had known about them when they were younger, so I'm putting them on here for anyone who might be able to benefit from it.
And lastly, a friend and fellow Autism parent reminded me that I should get to the root of the issue. Her advice:
"Any routine to bathrooming? Is he time trained? If you can figure out the time he goes you can make sure to have him on the pot if he is potty trained and if not can change him right away. Doing some ABC data collection could help figure out the why he is doing it. ( A- Antecedent; what occurs directly before and/or leading up to the behavior (fecal smearing)? B- Behavior; the behavior itself; C- Consequence; what occurs after the behavior including reactions of caretakers? ) 
If it sensory then something simple as playing with strong scented Play-Doh or finger painting. If it's attention seeking cleaning everything up without eye contact and no words past " take off pants , get in shower" pretty much basic simple instructions. If it's something that started as something and has turned into habit an overcorrection procedure would be the first step I would take ( making him clean it , and make sure it isn't fun in any way shape or form , I used vinegar water as my son didn't like the smell and it didn't take too long for him to understand that poop play ended in him having to smell vinegar and clean ) I have found most behaviors here in autism land seem to be escape , sensory , or obtaining driven. So ABC data would be great to start with."

Good luck to all of us, as we continue to embark on our "crappy" journeys.

Jan 16, 2017

Safety Suggestions for Our Wanderers

We recently moved to a new home.  Since moving in, one of our children has gotten out of the house and explored the neighborhood numerous times.  It's become such an issue that, like many autism parents out there, we basically have had to barricade our home from the inside.  We started out with a regular deadbolt, and when he figured how to use the key to get out, we upgraded to a digital deadbolt.  This is not the one-sided kind.  We found one where you have to enter a combination on both sides of the door. Here is a link to the one we have.  It can be tricky to install (we ended up installing it upside down to get it to fit correctly in our door), but so worth it.:

We are also basically on a first-name basis with our local police department.  They are usually pretty understanding.  Thank goodness.

Another thing we ended up doing is putting together a flyer introducing all of our kids to the neighbors. (I also gave it to the local law enforcement agency, who forwarded it to their patrol vehicles). Below is an example you can refer to, if you want to make your own flyer. Since I have three kids with severe autism, my example has three.  I was so grateful I handed out the flyers to my neighbors.  I have had two phone calls since telling me that my child was at different neighbors' houses, and yes, he just walked in, opened their fridges and ate their cheese.  It was a good way to meet some nice and understanding new friends.